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Curated research library of TV news clips regarding the NSA, its oversight and privacy issues, 2009-2014

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Primary curation & research: Robin Chin, Internet Archive TV News Researcher; using TV News Archive service.

Speakers

James Risen
NYT National Security Journalist
CSPAN 08/14/2014
Risen: It's about some basic issues that affect all journalists and all Americans. My lawyers always tell me never to talk about my case but there are a couple of things I can say. And one is that the justice department and the Obama administration are the ones who turned this really into a fundamental fight over press freedom. In their appeal to the fourth circuit, they said this case, the central issue in this case was not some details or specifics or anything. The fundamental thing this case was about was there was no such thing as reporter’s privilege.
James Risen
NYT National Security Journalist
CSPAN 08/14/2014
Risen: I want to make sure the same protections I have had in my career are there for the future reporters in America. Because there is no way we could do our jobs if we don't have the ability to have aggressive investigative reporting in America and to have the ability to maintain confidential sources. There is just no way to conduct aggressive investigative reporting without a reporter’s privilege of some kind, without confidential sources. And I don't believe you can have democracy without aggressive investigative reporting and freedom of the press.
James Risen
NYT National Security Journalist
CSPAN 08/14/2014
Risen: if you read the government's brief in the fourth circuit appeal, that's what they say -- there's no such thing as a reporters privilege. And so they turned this case into a showdown over the first amendment and over the freedom of the press in the United States. I’m happy to carry on that fight, but it wasn't me who really started it. this has been a long case -- I got subpoenaed in 2008 first, but what I can say now is with all of these people showing their support, I'm willing to keep fighting.
Dean Baquet
Executive Editor of The New York Times
CSPAN 08/14/2014
Baquet: The time he (Jim Risen) was at the LA Times the time he was at the NY Times that’s his bread and butter. And it's been harder for him to make new sources. His current sources are nervous about talking to him. Things get slowed down because it's not like you can exchange e-mails with them or have phone conversations with them. That said, just as a plug to Jim who is a particularly tenacious reporter, I would say if you look at over the last year while he has worked up against this problem of the government going after him, he's broken big stories He was one or the two or three lead reporters we put on the story when
Dean Baquet
Executive Editor of The New York Times
CSPAN 08/14/2014
Baquet: His (James Risen’s) mood is-- he's nervous. I don't think he’s nervous because he is worried about going to jail. I think he's nervous because if you imagine covering a beat and suddenly all the people you deal with are nervous about dealing with you in particular, and this is the beat you have covered for a decade, I think that sort of throws you off your game.
Dean Baquet
Executive Editor of The New York Times
CSPAN 08/14/2014
Baquet: I can think of a lot of cases where I made a mistake. I can think of a lot of cases where I made a mistake and was too cautious. But by and large, those are the standards. It’s got to come from someone high up. It ‘s got to be very specific. I don’t want to hear that I will have blood on my hands. I don't want to hear the vague, you will help the terrorists. I want very, very specific stuff.
Dean Baquet
Executive Editor of The New York Times
CSPAN 08/14/2014
Baquet: I think that he (Snowden) provoked an important discussion that the country wasn’t having and could only have had with his disclosures. I think that Snowden gets a tremendous amount of credit. I think the country barely knew the extent of the NSA spying. I think glimpses of it and there had been stories over the years, but I think he provoked a really significant discussion and a debate that we should have had. I actually think the NSA’s position in this case is a little bit untenable. Somebody should have said, I would argue, that, is the country ready for the giant amount of spying that the NSA can do?
Amy Goodman
Host and Executive Producer for Democracy Now
KCSM 08/14/2014
Goodman: A new report by The Intercept news site reveals the National Security Agency is secretly providing troves of data to nearly two dozen government agencies using a Google-like search engine. Documents from Edward Snowden revealed that for years the NSA has made data directly available to domestic law enforcement agencies like the Drug Enforcement Administration and FBI. The search tool known as ICReach contains information on both foreigners and millions of US citizens who’ve not been accused of wrongdoing. It’s designed to share more than 850 billion phone, email and web records. That’s more than twice the number of stars in the Milky Way.
Ryan Gallagher
Reporter for The Intercept
KCSM 08/28/2014
Gallagher: Our news story is exposing the NSA secret documents as a Google-like search tool (ICReach) to sift through hundreds of billions of communications records from phone calls, e-mails, internet chats, location data from cell phones and virtually every kind of metadata you can think of and more. And not only that, this information has been made accessible to almost two dozen agencies in the United States. Most of them are intelligence community agencies, but among those includes to domestic law enforcement like the FBI and drug enforcement administration. It is a vast scope. It’s much larger than I think what people expected.
Ryan Gallagher
Reporter for The Intercept
KCSM 08/28/2014
Gallagher: General Alexander was kind of the-- we described him as the kind of mastermind (of ICReach). Because he was the architect behind this. Fascinating details in these documents that go right back to the early 1990's.
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